Organ Donation During COVID-19

One organ donor can save many lives. With the Coronavirus spreading fast in the United States and having thousands of new cases everyday, organ donation has been a highly talked about topic.

Frequent questions that have been asked:

Can I become an organ donor during the coronavirus?

  • Yes, you are able to sign up online to become an organ donor. You can sign up with your state donor registry. 

Can people who have had COVID-19 donate any organs?

  • For now, no. Patients who are currently positive for the coronavirus or die from it are unable to donate their organs. But some sources say, if a patient recovers from COVID-19, they would have to take a month to recover, along with two negative test results. 

If a patient has a medical condition, can they still donate their organs in the future?

  • If you have a medical condition, there is a high chance you can still donate your eyes or tissues after your death and that will be determined by a medical professional.

Can a patient get a transplant if they test positive?

  • Depending on your medical team, they will make that decision. Some factors that will go into that would be to make sure you are no longer sick or have any of the symptoms. 

What can I do to protect myself from the virus being an organ donor?

  • The main things we can all do to make sure to wear a mask, social distance when going out, and avoid touching your face and eyes.

If a patient is on the waitlist, would they have to wait longer now?

  • Depending on which state you are living in, some places are still doing transplants during this time. It is important to get an update with your local care provider for more information. 

Hundreds and thousands of people across the country continue to need transplants to save their lives. It is very important to stay healthy and safe during these times and to also make sure you are still eligible to be able to donate your organs in the future. If you are an organ donor or transplant recipient it is important to talk to your local care provider and medical team for updates. 

Sources:

HRSA

UVA Health

Images:

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-Amanda Goh, Executive Intern